Adam McQuaid feels for Pascal Dupuis

DJ Bean
December 11, 2015 - 1:54 pm
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[caption id="attachment_55029" align="alignright" width="400"] Blood clot issues caused Pascal Dupuis to announce his retirement this week. (Matt Kincald/Getty Images)[/caption] Adam McQuaid doesn'€™t know Pascal Dupuis. All he'€™s heard from mutual friends is what a great guy he is. He does, however, know Dupuis'€™ current situation better than most hockey players. A longtime Penguins winger and Sidney Crosby linemate, Dupuis announced this week that he was retiring from hockey because of issues with blood clots that date back to January of 2014. McQuaid had his own scare with a blood clot during the 2012 lockout, when his right arm suffered massive swelling in the fall. The blood clot, which was under his collarbone, required surgery that involved removing a rib and part of his neck neck muscle. For the grounded yet oft-injured McQuaid, his experience with the blood clot made him feel more grateful for his health. Asked about Dupuis Friday, McQuaid expressed both disappointment in the player'€™s on-ice fate but optimism for his off-ice future. "I think he said it himself, that his priority is his family and his health and [his longterm] health," McQuaid said. "Any time anyone'€™s health gives out on them, you feel for them. I'€™m sure that they'€™ll miss not having him in the lineup." Dupuis returned at the start of last season from both a knee injury and blood clot issues, but was diagnosed with another blood clot in his lung of November of 2014, ending his season. The 36-year-old returned again to play in 18 games this season before shutting it down for good. Dupuis'€™ condition was both more serious and more recurring than McQuaid'€™s. The Boston defenseman was assured at the time of his blood clot and subsequent surgical work that aside from months spent on blood thinners, it "wouldn'€™t be an issue going forward," as it hasn'€™t. As such, McQuaid was quick to note that though "a blood clot'€™s still a blood clot," he wasn'€™t comparing his misfortune to Dupuis'. "It'€™s not quite the same thing, but I can relate," he said. "Mine was a little more short-term, but I know what it'€™s like to go through the whole process. It definitely makes you reevaluate things and appreciate things and realize how lucky we are to do what we do, and to have your health '€” mainly, having your health. "I'€™m sure that as disappointed as he is, staying on the protocol [means] he'€™ll have a long and happy life, so you take the positives and look at all the great things that he still has to look forward to." At the time of McQuaid'€™s blood clot, its silver lining was that it came during the lockout and didn'€™t require him to miss games. Looking at how much worse things could have been, McQuaid said he considers himself blessed that it proved to be a speed bump rather than the major roadblock blood clots can be for athletes. "It'€™s one of those things where you can think of it as, like, 'Why is this going on? Why am I having to do this?" McQuaid said. "Then you look at it like, '€˜Well, I'€™m lucky that it'€™s just a short-term thing, too.'"

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