The Capitals are considered the Eastern Conference's lone Cup contender (Getty Images)

Bruins believe in Capitals hype, but know well that 'anything can happen'

DJ Bean
March 05, 2016 - 6:48 am
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The Eastern Conference picture has been clear pretty much all season: There's the Capitals and there's everyone else. In ranking first in the NHL in goals per game and third in goals against per game, the Capitals are the clear favorite to represent the East in the Stanley Cup Final this season, but at the very least, they will run away with the Presidents' Trophy. Their 98 points through 64 games puts them on pace for 126 points; since the return from the 2004-05 lockout, only twice has a team had a 120-point season (Detroit with 124 in 2005-06 and Washington with 121 in 2009-10). The Capitals have beaten the B's in both of the teams' meetings entering Saturday's contest at TD Garden. The Bruins are among the teams trying to establish themselves as a potential "other Eastern Conference powerhouse." As the last Eastern Conference to win the Cup and a common favorite in seasons leading up to this one, the Bruins know well that being considered the favorite in the East doesn't always pan out. Boston dominated the 2011-12 regular season before being knocked off by the No. 7 ranked Capitals in seven games. "Let me put it this way: Every playoffs, there's been surprises," Claude Julien said Saturday morning. "I don't put a ton of stock into who's in and who's out. We all know Washington's one of the favorites in our conference; rightfully so. They have a great team and their record shows it, but in this game anything can happen. "We go about our business and go day-by-day. To overthink that situation to me is not healthy. To just go out there and do your job and look forward to what you have to do is probably the best way to look at that situation." Dennis Seidenberg said that if the Bruins are no longer considered in the class they once were, it alleviates the pressure that their stronger clubs of seasons past had. "We like being in the underdog role," Seidenberg said. "It means we can perform without pressure, but that team is really good over there. They're very, very deep, very balanced scoring, very deep on defense. They're the favorite for a reason, but with that comes a lot of pressure, a lot of certainty. Once we get into the playoffs, anything can happen. That's what happened to us when we lost against them in seven games. If there's a team that plays well at the right time and has a goalie that plays very well, anything can happen. We'll see." The Bruins will try to pull off their second consecutive upset against a Cup favorite Saturday when they host the Capitals. Much like the Blackhawks team that Boston defeated on Thursday, the Capitals will be playing the second night of a back-to-back and will have their backup goaltender in net. Still, defeating the Blackhawks and Capitals in succession would not only be a feather in this post-deadline Bruins team's cap, but it would secure much-needed points that many figured would be unattainable this week. The Bruins enter Saturday's game in third place in the Atlantic Division, though current wild card Detroit sits three points behind them with one game in hand. Including Saturday, the B's have 17 games remaining in their regular-season schedule. "Before you know it, the season will be over," Julien said. "There's not that many games left, so we need to assert ourselves every game. It's not so much what it means more than what we need to do here. We need to bring our A game and understand that we have to play a lot like we did the other night, be strong in all areas in order to beat good teams like Washington."

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