Michael Ryder: 'I know what I have to do'

DJ Bean
April 12, 2011 - 10:35 am
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WILMINGTON -- All things considered, Michael Ryder stunk it up down the stretch for the Bruins in the regular season. Playing out the third season of a three-year, $12 million deal Ryder scored just one goal over his last 17 games en route to wrapping up a second consecutive 18-goal campaign. Through his struggles, the hope for the Bruins was that Ryder could pick it up in the playoffs. Given his 13 points in 11 games in the 2009 playoffs, it wouldn't seem so inconceivable. It's far from a sure thing, as the signs of life from the forward seemed minimal at times over the final two months of the season (two goals over 25 games). Ryder had only five points in 13 playoff games last year, but he can understand why fans might expect him to elevate his game come the postseason. "Playoff time is pretty easy to get pumped up for," Ryder said in his usual reserved demeanor. "This is what we play for. It's the most exciting time of the year, and if you can't have fun and can't get excited to play, the I think there's something wrong. I enjoy the playoffs, and I want to make sure I get off to a good start and try to help this team go as far as we can." Given his laid-back attitude, it's no surprise that Ryder rarely shows frustration with any individual struggles. Even prior to the season, Ryder never got too low on the fact that he had a tough year in 2009-10. Yet just as he rarely shows frustration, Ryder is not the type of player to get carried away when things are going right. It seems it isn't so much a lack of emotion as it is keeping a level head. "Through my career, I've been through everything," Ryder said. "I've been a healthy scratch here and there and I've been through tough seasons. I've learned a lot from everything. For me, when I stay calm, I know what I have to do. I've been in the league long enough, and I know what I have to do to be successful to do things. "When things go bad, I kind of [have to] calm myself down, even though I don't show it sometimes," he admitted. "It takes a toll on you when you don't score and you're supposed to score. I just try to stay calm and try to find my way. I guess everyone has their own way of getting out of things." The Bruins can only hope that Ryder can find his way out of his funk. Coach Claude Julien, who hasn't been afraid to make Ryder watch games in the press box as a healthy scratch, is simply trying to look ahead rather than in the past. "Where [his game] it at doesn't really matter right now," Julien said after Tuesday's practice. "Where it's going to be when the playoffs start is what should matter. That's what we're going to wait and see. "It's a new season, it's a new start, and our worry right now is where we're going to be as a team."

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