John Farrell

John Farrell's history with Paul Molitor dates back to his first appearance

John Tomase
March 05, 2015 - 10:05 am
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Back in my days at the Boston Herald, I wrote a piece about pitchers' big league debuts. The subject came up again on Thursday, because the Red Sox open the spring against the Twins, who are managed by Hall of Famer Paul Molitor, who happens to be the first batter Farrell ever faced. The Herald story is archived, so I can't provide a link, but here's a chunk of it dealing with Farrell and Molitor, who had a more memorable confrontation a few days later in that 1987 season, when Farrell ended Molitor's 39-game hitting streak. Farrell had just turned 25 when he was summoned from Triple A Nashville to Cleveland in August of 1987 for a spot start. He arrived at the old Cleveland Stadium at 6:30 p.m., figuring he'd get acclimated before debuting a couple of days later. Then the Indians and Brewers engaged in a wild one that burned through Cleveland's thin bullpen. By the start of the 12th, closer Doug Jones had already thrown four innings and didn't have a fifth in him, so Farrell, who had literally made only one relief appearance in his life, was summoned. Leading off: future Hall of Famers Molitor and Robin Yount. "I threw two pitches," Farrell recalled, "and had runners on first and second." Farrell didn't let those two singles get to him. He "somehow found a way to weasel out of it," inducing Glenn Braggs to ground into a double play before Pat Tabler won it with a walkoff single in the bottom of the frame, making Farrell a winner in his debut. "There's an array of emotions running through you," Farrell said. "First time in the big leagues, extra-inning game, I've never pitched in the bullpen before, and here you are with two guys at the peak of their games at the time. It was daunting, to say the least. I threw 15 or 16 pitches, and I'll bet 13 of them were fastballs. I couldn't feel my body all that much." Farrell made his scheduled start three days later and improved to a 2-0 with a complete-game victory over the Tigers. Five days later, he became a footnote in history by ending Molitor's 39-game hitting streak as part of an epic duel with Brewers lefty Teddy Higuera, who tossed a 10-inning 1-0 shutout in a walkoff win that ended with Molitor on deck. "That was Teddy Higuera night," Farrell said. "Rick Manning drove in the winning run in the 10th and got booed."

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