David Ortiz

David Ortiz on Curt Schilling Twitter controversy: 'It makes you angry'

Rob Bradford
March 02, 2015 - 2:39 pm
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FORT MYERS, Fla. -- David Ortiz can understand Curt Schilling's frustrations. Not only is Ortiz also living the life of a high profile sports figure immersing himself in the world of Twitter, but he has experienced the good and bad when it comes to using the social media tool for personal recognition. It's why Ortiz exhibited a passionate response when informed of the Schilling saga, in which the former pitcher's post congratulating his daughter, Gabby, led to some vicious tweets directed at the high school senior. (To read more about the Schilling situation, click here for columns by John Tomase and Jerry Thornton. Schilling is scheduled to appear on the Dennis and Callahan Show Tuesday morning.) "It'€™s personal," said Ortiz. "I tweeted about my daughter graduating a while ago and most everybody was supportive. I think one or two people put up something stupid and you try to not pay attention to that but you see it. Every man would want to congratulate their kids. When you talk about your son or your daughter graduating, you'€™ve made it. You put a lot of work into it so your kids can be somebody in the future for society. Every time I heard somebody'€™s kid graduating I feel proud because I know how much it takes. So for anybody to criticize that, it'€™s wrong. "Now I'€™m going to dig into it because I'€™m going to support him 100 percent. If you have some personal issues with Curt about something he has done before, that'€™s your problem. But now, when he'€™s tweeting about his daughter, you respect that because if you'€™re the one tweeting about your daughter graduating you like to hear good things." Ortiz explained that the best course of action for Twitter trolls is to look the other way, but often times that's easier said that done. For instance, just recently he was put to the test with what would appear to be a seemingly congratulatory post for his native country's birthday. "The other day I tweeted something about Indepedence Day back in [the Dominican Republic]," Ortiz said. "I tweeted in Spanish and English. I first tweeted it in Spanish and then English because I wanted everybody to understand what I was trying to say. This jerk comes out of nowhere telling me that wrote it wrong in Spanish. But the way he wrote it was wrong. It pissed me off because, first of all, he didn'€™t know how to write something in Spanish, and No. 2, you'€™re trying to get me to write something in Spanish when you can'€™t even in Spanish. I put something back, but I took it off. "It'€™s hard, I'€™m not going to lie to you. The best thing to do is just leave it alone but there are always going to be jerks out there trying to get your attention." Still, as much as Ortiz understands the dynamic of social media criticism, when ridicule of family members enter into the conversation then he -- like most -- still has a difficult time understanding such actions. "It'€™s kind of hard," he said. "I know there are a bunch of [expletives] out there just waiting for you to say something or to do something so they can criticize you no matter what you say or what you do. Why would you criticize guy that has been through the whole thing he'€™s been through, and then they'€™re talking about his daughter who is graduating, for God'€™s sake? Really. Why would you criticize something like that. It makes you angry." (To view David Ortiz's Twitter account, click here.)