David Ortiz

How would David Ortiz speed up game? No more instant replay, fewer pitching changes

Rob Bradford
February 26, 2015 - 6:43 pm
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FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Much has been made of David Ortiz criticizing baseball for implementing a new rule preventing hitters from stepping out of the batter's box in an attempt to shorten games. But if not the MLB-mandated batter's box regulation, then how would Ortiz shave time off these games? Appearing on the Hot Stove Show: Spring Training Edition Thursday night, the Red Sox designated hitter offered one of his solutions. "First thing I would do would be cancel the replay thing," Ortiz said. "That takes a lot of time. When you have to review a play that just happened, man, sometimes that takes forever. If you call safe or out, they should just leave it right there like it used to be. "It'€™s taking forever, and we'€™re talking about shortening up the time. It'€™s taking forever. They have to go review and make sure the guy from New York say whatever he has to say. Sometimes you'€™ll be like, '€˜Man, this is taking forever.' €™" According to an MLB report in the middle of the 2014 season, the average time for a replay was 1:50. One adjustment made to the process for '15 is the ability for managers to inform umpires they want to challenge a play without leaving the dugout. Another solution offered by Ortiz to speed things up would be to limit pitching changes made by managers. According to FoxSports.com's Ken Rosenthal, such an idea was floated by Cubs president Theo Epstein at the most recent GM Meetings. Epstein's idea was to make it mandatory that all relievers be forced to face at least two (and possibly as many as three) batters per appearance. "How about every manager wants to match up every hitter after the fifth inning," Ortiz said. "That takes forever, too. There's games you see five or six guys pitching. That takes forever. So, if you're talking about timing, it's critical. The time you plan on saving, it's not going to be saved." Also on the show, Ortiz reiterated his stance regarding the batter's box rule. To listen to the entire interview, click here.

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