Rusney Castillo is battling a left oblique strain. (WEEI.com)

Rusney Castillo: Trip to minors wouldn't alter 'plan,' 'attitude,' or 'perspective'

Rob Bradford
March 05, 2015 - 10:30 am
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FORT MYERS, Fla. -- There is a long way to go before the Red Sox Opening Day roster is decided upon, but there is one scenario that should be broached: Rusney Castillo possibly starting in the minor leagues. It isn't believed that Castillo's left oblique strain will keep him out long enough to dent his chance at earning a spot in the Red Sox' outfield. ("I feel a lot better," he told WEEI.com through translator Adrian Lorenzo, "especially compared to the other days.") Still, the presence of Mookie Betts in center field, Shane Victorino in right field and Allen Craig and Daniel Nava presenting value on the roster has led to the thought that the $72.5 million man might not start the season in the majors. When asked about such an outcome, Castillo offered a level-headed response. "To me it wouldn't be anything that would alter my plan, or my attitude, or my perspective," he said. "If that's what it's got to be, that's what it's got to be. I'm just worrying playing and continuing to get reps and reps wherever they may come." Helping Castillo's approach is the security which comes with a contract that keeps him under Red Sox control through 2020. "Of course there is a degree of comfort in that that I'm going be here for a while," he noted. "At the same time, if you don't want to be in the minor leagues ramp it up and work harder to not be there." An interesting side note to Castillo possibly landing in the minor leagues is the debate throughout baseball about Cuban players being resistant to such a lot in life. Some have said that those making such great sacrifices to have a chance at playing in the big leagues often times are disillusioned when having to toil in the minors. Castillo, for one, doesn't subscribe to such a narrative. "Honestly, I haven't heard any complaints or frustrations from them on that end," the outfielder said. "From my personal experience, I took it as part of the process if that's what the management and the people who signed me decided what was best for when I got to the big leagues, to be as prepared as possible. I don't remember being any sort of frustration or questioning why I was going to the minor leagues. Looking back at it now, it helped me a lot to have that experience."

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