Gregory Campbell was one of many Bruins who came up big Tuesday night. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

How Bruins overcame uncharacteristically bad nights from Patrice Bergeron, Zdeno Chara

Scott McLaughlin
October 21, 2014 - 7:51 pm
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Usually the Patrice Bergeron line and Zdeno Chara-Dougie Hamilton pairing are the Bruins'€™ constants. They'€™re the guys who are going to create offensive-zone possessions and not make mistakes. That wasn'€™t the case on Tuesday. Bergeron was on the ice for all three of the Sharks'€™ goals, linemates Brad Marchand and Reilly Smith joined him for two of them (it is worth noting that Marchand had a nice power-play goal), and Chara was on the ice for two of them as well. Those four and Hamilton were the only Bruins who finished with Corsi-for percentages under 50 percent, meaning they were the only Bruins who were on the ice for more 5-on-5 shot attempts against than shot attempts for. That would seemingly be a recipe for disaster for the Bruins, especially when you consider that outside of the Carl Soderberg line, the rest of the team had been one giant question mark to this point in the season. David Krejci had looked good since his return, but linemate Milan Lucic was off to a slow start and he still didn'€™t have a set-in-stone right wing. The fourth line had featured several different combinations, and none of them had really done much. And the second and third defense pairings had been inconsistent at best, with Kevan Miller'€™s injury raising even more questions on the back end. At least for one night, those questions turned into answers. Lucic, Krejci and rookie right wing Seth Griffith factored into four of the Bruins'€™ five goals, with Lucic notching three assists and Griffith scoring his first NHL goal. Two of the goals they were on the ice for -- Griffith'€™s and Torey Krug'€™s -- came as the direct result of getting bodies to the net. Krejci set a great screen on Krug'€™s, and then Lucic created some net-front havoc that freed up Griffith on his goal. "I think it definitely was the best game that we'€™ve played so far this season," Lucic said. "You saw we were hungry in the O-zone and hungry getting pucks to the net. We made some smart decisions in some important areas and it just seems like things are starting to head in the right direction." The fourth line of Daniel Paille, Gregory Campbell and Simon Gagne was a positive possession line that even created some chances against the Sharks'€™ top two lines. They scored what proved to be the game-winner midway through the third when Paille won the puck along the boards and threw a shot on net that Campbell tipped in for his first goal of the season. Campbell and Paille were also big on the penalty kill, especially late in the game when Bergeron went to the box for a four-minute double minor. Until Krejci'€™s empty-netter to seal the win, Campbell had the biggest play on that kill when he blocked a Joe Thornton shot that came off a Chara turnover. "We'€™ve got to be a responsible, reliable line, and Claude [Julien] has to trust us to put us in those situations," Campbell said. "With hard work comes trust, and if we'€™re playing our game and we'€™re in on the forecheck and creating chances and bringing energy to the lineup, then he usually has confidence in us." As for the bottom two defense pairings, the only glaring error was a bad miscommunication between Krug and Dennis Seidenberg that led to a goal, but as Julien pointed out after the game, Bergeron'€™s line was just as much at fault, as Smith had failed to clear the zone and Bergeron and Marchand had gotten caught up ice. Outside of that, the Seidenberg-Krug and Matt Bartkowski-Adam McQuaid pairings played well. Krug'€™s goal and two assists obviously stand out, but let'€™s not overlook the fact that Seidenberg had seven shots on goal and 12 shot attempts, and that he and Krug had Corsi-for percentages of 63 and 62 percent, respectively. McQuaid and Bartkowski weren'€™t far behind at 61 and 57 percent, respectively, and McQuaid was also big on that final penalty kill. Obviously this is just one game. No one should think that all of the Bruins'€™ question marks are gone and that everyone'€™s going to be great from here on. But on a night when the Bruins'€™ best players were uncharacteristically unreliable, it was encouraging to see everyone else step up and show that they can lead the way, too.