Ryan Spooner

Ryan Spooner, Joonas Kemppainen, Brett Connolly jell quickly, create chances in Bruins' win over Maple Leafs

Scott McLaughlin
November 21, 2015 - 6:50 pm
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A quick look at Saturday night'€™s box score wouldn'€™t reveal anything notable about the Bruins'€™ third line. Ryan Spooner, Joonas Kemppainen and Brett Connolly didn'€™t score. None of them played more than Spooner'€™s 14:40. They combined for four shots on goal, which is fine but certainly not something that jumps out at you. But Saturday night was a notable game for that trio. They played really well together, even if it didn'€™t show up in the box score. They had a lot of puck possession and created some of the Bruins'€™ best scoring chances in a game that didn'€™t have many of them. And to be honest, that was a little surprising. Spooner, Kemppainen and Connolly had spent hardly any time together before Saturday, yet they appeared to have pretty good chemistry. Spooner had played the wing only in spurts before Saturday, yet he looked comfortable there and made things happen from the left side. Kemppainen hadn'€™t exactly been lighting the world on fire on the fourth line, yet he didn'€™t look out of place at all in a top-nine role. "I think most of the game we played pretty well together," Spooner said. "We talked a lot before the game and just said, '€˜If we don'€™t have much, just try to get the puck in deep.'€™ We did that. And I think off the rush, we had a couple chances too. I thought it went well for sure." Spooner, Kemppainen and Connolly all entered Saturday as negative possession players in terms of both regular Corsi and relative Corsi. You wouldn'€™t have been able to guess that watching Saturday night'€™s game against Toronto, though. They were the Bruins'€™ top three players in terms of Corsi-for percentage, with all three finishing the night at 69 percent or better. They combined for one fewer shot attempt than Patrice Bergeron'€™s line and three more than David Krejci'€™s line, despite getting significantly less ice time. They also created a couple good chances that didn'€™t even count as shot attempts -- a Kemppainen centering pass just missed a charging Spooner early in the first period, and a Spooner feed for a charging Connolly did the same midway through the third. On the latter chance, Spooner'€™s speed down the wing was clearly a factor, something Claude Julien was happy to point out after the game. "I think Spoons has really done a good job on the left wing there, adapting to it and using his speed," Julien said. "A lot more involved in the last two games, and that'€™s what we need out of Ryan. And that'€™s a sign of a young player really who'€™s getting it. He wants to be better, so kudos to him." Spooner said after the game that he'€™s still not completely comfortable on the wing -- he said he'€™s probably played wing fewer than 20 times in his life -- but he also noted that having fewer defensive responsibilities helped, as he admitted that his defense as a center hasn'€™t always been great. Kemppainen helps in that respect, as he is pretty responsible defensively. And Kemppainen clearly benefited from playing with faster, more skilled players. Whether Spooner, Kemppainen and Connolly stay together remains to be seen. Frank Vatrano is expected back soon, perhaps as early as Monday, so expect more line-juggling to make room for him. But even if they don'€™t stay together for now, it'€™s nice for Julien to know that he has this as a bottom-six option that can be effective in the future.

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